Explore our inaugural issue of Radicle Magazine.

In botany, the radicle is a catalyst. It is the first sprout to appear when a seed is developing into a plant. The radicle anchors the seedling in its infancy and becomes the plant’s primary root system, providing stability and supporting the plant’s health and longevity. In homage, we offer Radicle, an invitation for you to take root.

an invitation to take root

Letter from the Editor

In botany, the radicle is a catalyst. It is the first sprout to appear when a seed is developing into a plant. The radicle anchors the seedling in its infancy and becomes the plant’s primary root system, providing stability and supporting the plant’s health and longevity.

In homage, we offer Radicle, an invitation for you to take root.

Radicle is the manifestation of Earth in Color’s philosophy, which grew out of my experience being a Black woman studying environmental sustainability at Stanford University. I felt like I was stuck in the rift between the Black community and the environmental movement. I didn’t see myself, my culture, or my community present in those healthy and sustainable futures that were being imagined in my college courses and in the broader environmental movement. Not only did I feel like the movement was missing valuable members (i.e., us), I felt like we were being robbed of the opportunity to heal through a deep connection to the natural world and I wanted to change that.

Racism, oppression, and systemic injustice have partially severed our historical connection to the natural world. The nourishment and liberation found in nature have been replaced with painful histories and inherited fear, telling us that “Black people don’t go camping,” that “Black people don’t eat kale,” that conservation, preservation, nature engagement, and land stewardship aren’t a part of Black identities and livelihoods. We know that is not true. We know that we are deeply connected to our natural environments. Radicle exists to remind us of this truth. It reminds us who we come from, where we come from, and how we’ve been living. This is really why Earth in Color exists—to turn inherited environmental apathy into what I like to call Earth curiosity, our innate connection to the Earth. Through these pieces, we are deepening our cultural ties to the land and regenerating our kinship with the natural world, knowing that this will not only heal our bodies, but it will also heal our families, our community, and the Earth we inhabit.

Radicle is the fertile ground for your personal germination. The art, stories, activities, and recipes in this inaugural issue were created to spark joy and make our collective transformation and growth pleasurable. The dynamic pages of Radicle are waiting to be written on, spattered with sauce, mulled over, and revisited. As you take root, Radicle will be your tool kit, your workbook, your guide, and your companion.

—Darel Scott

Radicle Editor-in-Chief

Founder of Earth in Color

plant-forward recipes

EATS

EATS recipes are bites and nibbles that spark Earth curiosity, celebrate plants, and feed the soul through familiar flavors. These recipes are not about what you can and can’t eat or what you should and shouldn’t eat. They are simply about eating more plants and enjoying every single bite.

EATS recipes featured in issue 01:

– Chickpea Shakshuka

– Eat It Up, Beet It Up Salad

– Roasted Chickpeas

– Berry Compote

sharing black land history

UNEARTHED: Land, Legacy, and Liberation

Nia McAllister in conversation with Maria Pettis

Illustrations by Micael Nunez

UNEARTHED is a series that archives Black history, celebrating our historical and contemporary connections to place with a focus on the natural environment. In Radicle, we bring you written interviews highlighting our land histories—memories, family stories, inherited recipes, and personal connections that shape the character and legacy of a specific place. These stories illustrate the routines, rituals, and practices that connect us to our natural environments. UNEARTHED is a joyful call to action that encourages us to remember our roots, share our stories, celebrate our heritage, and renew our kinship with the natural world.

Our first UNEARTHED feature is entitled Land, Legacy, and Liberation: A Conversation with Maria Pettis. You can read this story on Grist.org.

listen as you read

Radicle Sounds

This playlist was curated by the editors and designers of Radicle Magazine, voted on (mostly civilly), and arranged to accompany your exploration of the stories and activities within this publication. Listen as you read, cook, or enjoy time in nature.

our vibrant ecosystem

Made possible by

Indiegogo Supporters

Trevor Caldwell, Kate Delhagen, Debra Dunn,

Michelle Edwards-Scott, Cecily Foote, Matthew Hart, D'Shai Hendricks, Brandon Hightower, Sara H. Hoagland, Kimiko Narita, Will Rosenzweig, Aishwarya Vardhana, Marcia J. Wood, David Young

Writers and Featured Voices

Ashley Song, BLK Girls Green House, Camryn Burkins, Darel Scott, Fiona Rae Brown, Nancy Chang, Nia McAllister, Maria Pettis, Vanessa Denali Standing Hours Farley of the Chippewa Cree Tribe of Rocky Boy Indians

Community Reviewers

dorien blue, Sabiha Basrai, Astrid Casimire, Tahirah Dean, Mariah Driver, Patrick Fenton, Tiara Gaillard, Mylan Gray, Amy Grigsby, AJ Hansen, Kristen Hewitt, Brandon Hightower, Nya Hughes, Uzoma Idah, John Lasack, Liz Lazowski, Aki Neumann, Lydia Ortiz, Maya Pete, Jamie L. Real, Will Rosenzweig, Lili Thompson, Lizzie Vaughan, Alexis Wilson

Artists

Adrianna Adams, Camryn Burkins, Claire Miles, Darel Scott, Indya McGuffin, Justin Weathers, Kayana Guerrero, Kendal Burkins, Lieyah Dagan, Micael Nuñez, Nancy Chang, Nancy Hoang, Nate Foxx, Paola Saliby, Soleil Summer

for personal germination

Get Radicle

We invite you to experience the 90+ pages of stories, activities, recipes, and much more that invite us to unearth our histories and take moments with nature.